Coral Gables Campus
 in the Sixties
Interviews with President Stanford & Harold Long
In this 1986 interview, Dr. Henry King Stanford, President of the University of Miami from 1961 -1982, discusses the impact of the protest movements of the 1960s on UM, his relationship with various student and community activists, and his personal involvement with the civil rights movement.

Part 1
Part 2
Miami lawyer, Harold Long, discusses his experiences as a UM undergraduate student (1964-1968), as well as his days as a student at UM's School of Law (1968-1971). Harold Long was among the founders of the United Black Students, and served as that groups president until 1968. [Interviewed 1986]





   Records containing these keyword(s): Gellman

Marc Gellman on the acid culture of the 1960s, Part 1
Age of Aquarius: 2002.
Time: 20 min
Marc Gellman, Professor of Psychology, describes the acid culture of the 1960s. Chemists looked for a way that the US government could use LSD, but after finding none, it was declared an "illegal substance." He talks about Dr. Timothy Leary's experiments with hallucinogenic mushrooms and his testing drugs on himself and his graduate students, leading to his dismissal from his position as professor of psychology at Harvard. Leary went on to become a leading proponent for the use of psychedelic drugs to expand the mind and alter perceptions. Also discussed is Ken Kesey, who had first come across LSD when, as a graduate student at Stanford, he wanted to earn some extra money on the side. He volunteered at Menlo Park VA Hospital in a government-sponsored program, participating in experiments conducted to study the effects of hallucinogenics. He and his friends formed a group called the Merry Pranksters, who promoted LSD. Their slogan was "Furthur" (further + future). The Merry Pranksters drove around California, then the country, and threw parties at which everyone consumed marijuana and LSD (the Kool-Aid was spiked with LSD, hence Tom Wolfe's title "The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test"). The Grateful Dead were the house group at Kesey's parties. The counterculture hipsters talked extensively about cultural revolution and wore funky, tie-dyed clothes. He discusses Jefferson Airplane and Grace Slick’s song "White Rabbit." Gellman recalls that he knew Bruce Springsteen when growing up in New Jersey; and reminisces about getting friends together and attending Woodstock.

Marc Gellman on the acid culture of the 1960s, Part 2
Age of Aquarius: 2002.
Time: min
Marc Gellman, Professor of Psychology, describes the acid culture of the 1960s. They realized it was going to be no mere concert. There were fans of the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, others who were propounding political ideas, and one attendee who had brought a huge amount of marijuana to give away.









Coral Gables Campus
 in the Sixties
Interviews with Mike Abrams & Jim Yasser

Jim Yasser served as student body president at UM 1969-1970. In this 1996 interview Yasser discusses the politics of confrontation and activism that he participated in as a student leader, and the relatively young and liberal university administration that transformed UM in the early 1970s.

Mike Abrams, who was a student at the University of Miami from 1965-1969, served on the Florida Legislature for 4 years, and was a University of Miami trustee. In this 1996 interview he discusses campus reaction to the Vietnam War, student politics, fraternity life, the Ratskeller, and other topics pertaining to student life in the 1960s.

Part 1
Part 2

The Stanford, Long, Abrams and Yasser videos were digitized from the VHS orginals in the William Bulter Oral History Collection and University of Miami 60th Anniversary History Oral History Collection in the University of Miami Archives & Special Collections, Otto G. Richter Library.


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